Limerick, Doolin, Galway and the Cliffs of Moher

  • May 20, 2016

Limerick, Shannon, Galway and the Cliffs of Moher Dr. J and The Twin Doctors Travel Bag spend day 3 of the Travel Bag’s Heritage Tour visiting The Burren, Limerick, Doolin, Galway and the Cliffs of Moher; while examining the connection…

Read More
Dublin’s Body Snatchers And Napoleon’s Teeth

Dublin’s Body Snatchers and Napoleon’s Teeth

  • May 16, 2016

Dr. J and The Twin Doctors Travel Bag explore some of Dublin Irelands weird and macabre medical history. From 18th and 19th century Body Snatchers robbing graves to provide medical schools with a constant supply of fresh new cadavers, to…

Read More

Dublin’s Body Snatchers and Napoleon’s Teeth

  • May 16, 2016

Dublin’s Body Snatchers and Napoleon’s Teeth Dr. J and The Twin Doctors Travel Bag continue their Ancestry.com inspired Heritage Tour of Ireland by exploring Dublin’s massive Glasnevin Cemetery. A place where Body Snatchers once roamed. After that, Dr. J sets…

Read More
Newgrange And Dublin’s Mummies

Newgrange and Dublin’s Mummies

  • May 16, 2016

Dr. Jamil and The Twin Doctors travel bag continue their Heritage Tour of Ireland by visiting the ancient Newgrange megalith of the Boyne Valley and the legendary mummies of Dublin's St. Michan's Church.

Read More

As Though They Have Nothing Left

  • April 10, 2016

 

As Though They Have Nothing Left
Dr. Jamil reflects on the week that he and his brother spent in Jordan working as part of a medical mission providing care to displaced Syrian refugees.

Jamil photoshoot 1 As though they have nothing

Dr. Jamil Abdur-Rahman

refugees fleeing as though they have nothing

Syrian refugee fleeing

Sometimes with adversity, inwardly, a person may gain so much; while outwardly, to many, it may look as though they have nothing left. Is this really so surprising though? After all consider, what can a person do when everything of material value has been taken away from them? Where can a person go when their home has been reduced to ash and to rubble? Who is a person, and who will they become when everything that once defined their very existence on this earthly plane has been laid bare? Who are they, and who will they become when they awaken to a reality that obscenely informs them that their former existence was nothing more than an illusion? A vivid dream perhaps, and one in which the specter of stability, normalcy, happiness and contentment looked and felt so real; but turned out to be no more real than the fairness, justice and repatriation is that they now so hopelessly long for? So take a moment to ask yourself the following. Does your nationality define who you are? Does your money define who you are? Are you your bank account? Do your friends define who you are? Do your family members define who you are? Does your job define who you are? Does your home define who you are? Do your borders define who you are? If these things do in fact define who you are, then who do you become when they’ve all been taken away from you? Who do you become when you’ve been stripped bare, rendered naked, and left with nothing more to hide behind? Who do you become when you are forced to face yourself and to define yourself simply by who you are and not by where you live, what you have, or who you have left? Spend some time in Jordan with Syrian refugees, and you will quickly come to know what it is that a person may gain inwardly when it looks outwardly as though they have nothing left.

Read More

Today we cried.

  • April 10, 2016

Today we cried.
Dr. Idries discusses his time in Sweileh.

Idries photoshoot 2

Idries Abdur-Rahman, MD, FACOG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today we cried. We had been strangers just moments before and now the three of us just sat there in that small blue room with the dusty curtains and together we cried.

 

On day 5 of the Jordan medical mission I found myself in Sweileh, a small town to the north of the capital city Amman. Our team today was smaller than on previous days and included myself, an Internist from Chicago, a Dermatologist from Ohio and a General Practitioner/Acupuncturist from New York City. The Sweileh clinic is a multi-specialty clinic that provides services to the local Syrian refugees who again lack access to medical services because they do not reside within refugee camps. Like all the days before, we arrived to find a waiting room that was bursting at the seams with people needing to be seen. The clinic director took me to an exam room with powder blue walls where I found an exam table, a pretty decent ultrasound machine and a closet full of medications. As we got settled, the gracious clinic staff brought us coffee, tea and pastries and advised us that they were available if there was anything that we needed. I have to admit that I always felt a bit guilty when clinic directors brought us food and beverages but anyone who has travelled in the middle east knows that this is just typical Arab hospitality. Great staff, nice facilities and a table full of coffee, tea and pastries! The day was definitely looking up.

 

Sweileh Jordan Medical Mission

Plate full of pastries given to me at the start of our day in Sweileh in my little blue exam room.

 

Sweileh Jordan Medical Mission

The waiting room in Sweileh (at the end of the day hence it is empty).

 

Read More